Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 7th Global Summit on Agriculture & Horticulture Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

Day 1 :

Keynote Forum

Ramchand Oad

Colorado State University, USA

Keynote: Efficient irrigation water management practices to sustain irrigated agriculture in arid climates

Time : 10:00-10:40

OMICS International Agri Summit 2016 International Conference Keynote Speaker Ramchand Oad photo
Biography:

Ramchand Oad has obtained his PhD degree from Cornell University and has been working as a Professor at Colorado State University since 1986. His career has focused on promoting economic welfare through sustainable development and management of water resources and by promoting its efficient use in irrigated agriculture. At Colorado State, in addition to teaching and research, he has worked with the North and Central Colorado Water Conservancy Districts and several Irrigation Companies to modernize their Water Delivery Systems. He has extensive work experience in developing countries, where he has worked as Consultant for the World Bank, Asian Development Bank and the USAID.

Abstract:

Historically, agriculture was the main water consumer in the arid Eastern Colorado. But the state’s demand for water has increased because of rapid urban growth and development of oil and gas industry. Urban communities started buying agricultural water rights to satisfy their growing demands. However, alternative land uses for farms without water right are limited and often they are left fallow. Therefore, rural communities are believed to be at risk because of the fast pace of this change. This paper will report on a collaborative research effort that is undertaken by the United Water and Sanitation District, the Platte River Water Development Authority and the Colorado State University. A combination of subsurface drip irrigation and deficit irrigation is under experimentation in the region with the objective of investigating alternatives to the current practice of buy-and-dry whereby urban cities buy and transfer water rights, leaving the rural agricultural lands fallow. The subsurface drip irrigation is an efficient water use technology that can be employed to raise crops with minimum amount of water. Also, the practice of deficit irrigation can assist farmers grow crops with small amounts of water. The proposed research will generate knowledge that can be used by the local farmers to successfully adopt these water management practices. In the context of deficit irrigation, the research will develop crop water production functions (CWPF) for selected crops. CWPF is the relationship between the amounts of water consumed by a crop and the resulting yield, and is used in water use optimization plans. The underlying promise of the research project is that farmers can keep part of their water for farming activities, rent the rest to other societal uses and benefit more from their water rights. The research will also provide a planning tool (software package) for famers to decide on the amount of water dedicated to on farm and/or off farms uses. The research is undergoing in an experimental field of 82 acres in Kersey, Colorado. The experimental field is divided into 19 zones of 3.5 to 5 acres. Each zone can be irrigated individually, that is applied water is controlled at the head of the zone by a valve and measured by a flow meter. Zone size is larger than conventional research plots and closer to farming plot size in the area (normally farmers irrigate every 10 acres under one valve). The field was equipped with subsurface drip irrigation system from Netafim in spring 2015. Water application is controlled by a programmable controller according to calculated water requirement on a daily basis. A weather station has also been installed in the field to record data required for water requirement calculations.

  • Agriculture & Food Security|Fertilizer & Pesticide|Agriculture & Forestry|Agriculture Law & Policy|Agricultural Production Systems|Crop Sciences
Location: Studio 11
Speaker
Biography:

Kit L. Chin, received his Ph.D. degree in horticulture at Louisiana State University. He is the project director of the research team who provides leadership in conducting world-wide roselle accession evaluation for small farm production in Louisiana, mentoring graduate students in roselle research, assessing the bioactivity of the roselle calyces and developing products for niche market. He has published several papers on the phytochemistry of the roselle plant. He has been providing consulting services to various small farmers in roselle production and product development.

Abstract:

Roselle (Hibiscus sabdariffa L.) has emerged as one of the most important specialty crops in the functional food sector due to its demonstrated medicinal properties and nutritional values of its calyx. However, research on Roselle leaves has been very limited, even though the leaves are widely consumed by a diverse population of ethnic groups and rich in antioxidants. This paper focuses the elemental nutrients, total polyphenol and antioxidant contents of the leaves of Roselle as affected by the application of an organic fertilizer, 4-2-2 (NPK) at different rates at the time of planting. Results show that higher rate of the fertilizer application increased macro-nutrient concentrations in leaves. Young leaves (top three leaves) accumulated more macronutrients than mature leaves located at the bottom three leaves based on 31-cm long shoots. P and K concentrations were found to be higher in young leaves. Fe was the only element present at higher amount in the mature leaves than young leaves within the micronutrients. However, the application of organic fertilizer at the time of planting did not show significant effect on total polyphenol and antioxidant contents on a dry-weight basis.

Speaker
Biography:

Oziniel Ruzvidzo has completed his Doctoral degree in Plant Biotechnology in 2009 at the University of the Western Cape in South Africa. He also undertook some Post-doctoral studies in the same subject area in 2010 at the University of Cape Town, South Africa. Currently, he is a full Professor and Principal Investigator of Plant Biotechnology in the Department of Biological Sciences at the North-West University, Mafikeng Campus, South Africa. He is an active member of several university committees including the Senate as well as an Editorial Member of various academic and research boards locally, regionally and internationally.

Abstract:

The need to develop agricultural crops with improved stress tolerance and/or resistance has led plant biotechnologists to strategically focus onto those plant molecules involved in the initiation and sustenance of cellular homeostasis. One such molecule, typically involved in signal transduction, is the cyclic adenosine 3’,5’-monophosphate (cAMP) generated by the enzyme adenylate cyclase (AC). However, even though ACs have previously been experimentally proven to be centrally involved in numerous stress response systems in various organisms (bacteria, fungi and lower eukaryotes), their existence and/or functional roles in higher plants have until recently, been a matter of debate and serious controversy. To date, only four higher plants ACs have been functionally confirmed, specifically in Arabidopsis thaliana, Zea mays, Nicotiana benthamiana and Hippeastrum hybridum. Apparently, since it is inconceivable that a single AC per plant can account for all the currently known and/or reported cAMP-dependent processes in higher plants, we then, in this study, set out to enzymatically and functionally characterize a second probable AC candidate from A. thaliana in the form of a putative clathrin assembly protein (AtCAP: At1g68110), with a view of elucidating its exact physiological and biological roles in higher plants. In this regard, we then firstly conducted a preliminary bioinformatic analysis of this putative protein candidate followed by its molecular cloning, recombinant expression and endogenous activity assaying, then its affinity purification and in vitro functional characterization and finally, its co-expressional and bioinformatic functional analysis. Our findings unequivocally, indicated that this novel protein is indeed a multi-domain, multi-functional bona fide soluble adenylate cyclase (sAC) responsible for biotic stress responses and whose functional activities are essentially mediated by the cAMP via a calmodulin/SORLIP1AT core motifdependent signaling system.

Biography:

Tapan Kumar Nath has completed his Bachelor’s and Master’s in Forestry from University of Chittagong, Bangladesh and obtained PhD in Forest Science from the University of Tokyo, Japan. He was awarded a two-year (2007-2009) JSPS (Japan Society for the Promotion of Science) Post-doctoral fellowship just after his PhD. He joined at Institute of Forestry and Environmental Sciences, University of Chittagong as a Lecturer in 1999 and has been working till date. He was a Visiting Faculty (January - March 2010) at Asian Institute of Technology, Thailand and Visiting Professor (April - October 2013) at the University of Tokyo. He has been teaching several courses related to collaborative natural resources management in Bangladesh, Japan and Thailand. He joined at the University of Nottingham Malaysia Campus in March 2014 as an Associate Professor.

Abstract:

Shifting cultivation is now considered a largely unsustainable type of agro-ecosystem because of declines in productivity that come with increasing population pressure, shortening of fallow periods and non-availability of alternative land. Efforts to promote the adoption of agro-forestry to improve shifting cultivation systems have been increasing. Here, we discuss intensification of agro-forestry in shifting cultivation areas of Chittagong hill tracts (CHT), Bangladesh through community participation. Drawing on field data from a collaborative agro-forestry research project implemented in CHT, it describes the use of agro-forestry development, its sustainability, the challenges and opportunities of agro-forestry development. We worked with villagers in three para (hamlets) to develop a participatory approach to the development of agro-forestry options. On the basis of a combination of participants’ preferences and expert opinion, crop combinations were selected and agri-hortisilvicultural agro-forestry systems developed. These participants now cultivate agricultural crops continuously year-on-year on slopes formerly subject to shifting systems. The benefit-cost ratio for agricultural crops was 3:1. Seedlings are growing well and average survival rates at more than 70%. More than 80% participants are now interested in agro-forestry and 54% desire to expand agro-forestry to other areas. For the future development and promotion of agro-forestry by tribal communities in the CHT, conclusions are drawn about modes of collaborative working with local partners.

Speaker
Biography:

Daljit Singh has completed his PhD at the age of 26 years from Universiti Putra Malaysia and postdoctoral studies from Department of Geography and Planning, University of Liverpool, UK. He is currently working as senior lecturer in the Faculty of Agriculture, UPM, Malaysia.

Abstract:

A field study was carried out to determine the impact of mulching and planting distance on the growth of Orthosiphon stamineus, soil properties and also to observe the changes in pH and EC of the soil in response to mulching and planting distance using an organic planting system. The experiment was conducted at Farm 16, Faculty of Agriculture UPM. The four treatments consisted of mulching, non-mulching, planting distance of 30 cm × 30 cm and planting distance of 45 cm × 45 cm. After eight weeks of planting, the plants were harvested, while soil pH and EC were measured on a weekly basis throughout the planting period. The soil was also analysed for physical and chemical properties. The results showed application of the treatments increased the soil pH and maintained the soil EC at the suitable range for crop growth. The best treatment to use was mulching with planting distance 30 cm × 30 cm, because soil pH increased proportionally on a weekly basis and soil EC ranges also were suitable for O. stamineus growth. Both planting distances showed significant differences on plant growth, moisture content, cation exchange capacity and exchangeable K. The treatments mulching and non-mulching showed significant differences on soil bulk density, porosity and exchangeable magnesium.

Speaker
Biography:

Franklin Eziho Nlerum has a PhD in Rural Sociology and Development. His research interests are in agricultural extension, rural sociology and rural development. Currently, he is a Senior Lecturer. He has worked in Rivers State Agricultural Development Program as a Block Extension Supervisor, Subject Matter Specialist (Agronomy/Plant Protection) and an Assistant Director of Agriculture. He has published over 40 papers in both local and international journals. He is an Editorial Board Member of Pyrex Journals (Journal of Agricultural Extension and Rural Development) and is also a member of several professional bodies in his field of research interest.

Abstract:

This study analyzed farmers utilization of insecticide treated bed nets for malaria prevention in Ahoada East Local Government Area of Rivers State, Nigeria. The sample size of the study was 100 respondents which were randomly selected from farmers in the area who benefited from the free distribution of the nets by Rivers State Government. The questionnaire and the interview schedule were used in eliciting data from the respondents. Data were analyzed with percentage, mean score, t-test and multiple regressions. Socio-economic result shows that the respondents on the average were 40 years old, earned monthly net income of N24,184.00 ($121.38) and spent 11 years in schooling. More results indicated that while the ownership of the net was as high as 71.73%, the actual utilization was as low as 28.27%. The t-test result showed significant difference between ownership and utilization of the nets in area. Result of multiple regression analysis indicated a multiple determination (R2) of 0.6333. Determinants of the utilization of the net were age, sex, occupation and educational level of the respondents. The two major constraints in the utilization of the net in the area were inadequate information and poor design and inconvenience of hanging. In order to improve the rate of utilization of the net in the area, the study recommends enhanced information which will lead to a better education of the beneficiaries. A better design which will reduce the inconveniences associated with hanging of the nets is also recommended.

T B S Rajput

Indian Agricultural Research Institute, India

Title: Perspective of micro irrigation in future agriculture
Speaker
Biography:

T B S Rajput earned a Doctorate degree in Soil and Water Conservation Engineering (IARI, New Delhi-1985) after graduating in Agricultural Engineering from GBPUAT Pantnagar in 1973. He has done his Post-graduation in Soil and Water Conservation Engineering from IIT Kharagpur-1976 and has over 40 years of experience in Research, Post-graduate teaching and training of professionals at different levels in the field of Agricultural Water Management. He has joined the Water Technology Centre as a Scientist through the first batch of ARS in 1976. Currently, he is working as an Emeritus Scientist at the Centre.

Abstract:

Agricultural sector is the largest consumer of water. The demand for water has also been consistently increasing in nonagriculture sectors including, municipal use and industry etc., and such uses can often be at the cost of agriculture. The dominant method of irrigation practiced in large parts of the country is surface irrigation under which crop utilize only less than one half of the water released and remaining half gets lost in conveyance, application, runoff and evaporation. In order to reach anywhere close to so-called water smart agriculture all these water losses in irrigation need to be minimized. Micro-irrigation offers a scientific alternative for reducing irrigation water losses practically to a zero level. Micro-irrigation conventionally has been considered useful only for a limited number of widely spaced crops. During the last decade microirrigation systems have been evolved to efficiently irrigate orchards, vegetables, cereals, pulses and other crops too. A large number of research studies have shown that micro-irrigation can be adopted successfully in most crops including so-called water guzzling crops like sugarcane and rice. Many farmers have validated research findings and have demonstrated that almost all crops can be grown with drip irrigation not only successfully but profitably too. We need to look beyond the mindset of micro-irrigation for widely spaced crops and innovative steps need to be initiated for large scale adoption of micro-irrigation methods for saving water for extending irrigation facility to hitherto un-irrigated fields. Hon’ble Prime Minister of India has launched an ambitious irrigation plan (namely, Prime Minister Krishi Sinchai Yojna, PMKSY) to take irrigation water to each cultivated field. The Indian States like Gujarat, Andhra Pradesh, Tamil Nadu, Maharashtra and Karnataka have evolved several successful models for large scale adoption of micro-irrigation in the past. In recent times, the efforts of State of Karnataka in launching large micro-irrigation projects with thousands of hectare command namely Sehore and Ramthal may provide lead for others to follow. Integration of micro-irrigation with major irrigation projects, particularly in their tail end reaches, are likely to become a reality soon to bring at least 10 percent canal command areas under micro-irrigation as envisaged under PMKSY. Integration of micro-irrigation with watershed projects particularly for utilization of harvested water as aimed under PMKSY too are likely to result in efficient utilization of available water resources in agriculture with significant savings of water for extending the irrigation facilities to hitherto un-irrigated areas. India has already achieved a distinction of having the largest area under micro-irrigation. India already stands first in area coverage under micro-irrigation (exceeding 8 Mha) and is likely to surge ahead in its adoption in future in view of the increasing food demand and shrinking land and water resources availability for agriculture. The article presents the development and adoption of micro irrigation in India and its likely role in future agriculture.

Biography:

Adamu Muhammad obtained his B Agriculture and MSc Crop Science in Usmanu Danfodiyo University, Sokoto, Nigeria. He completed his PhD in Agronomy at the Ahmadu Bello University, Zaria, Nigeria. He is currently the Head of Department of Crop Science, Deputy Dean of the Post-graduate School and Director of Examinations and Registration of the Kebbi State University of Science and Technology, Aliero, Nigeria. He has published more than 30 papers in reputed journals nationally and internationally.

Abstract:

Field trials were conducted during the 2010/11 and 2011/12 dry seasons at the Teaching and Research Farm of the Kebbi State University of Science and Technology Aliero, located at Jega (lat. 12° 11’N; long. 4° 16E and 300 m above sea level) in the Sudan savanna ecological zone of Nigeria. The aim was to study the effect of irrigation interval and NPK fertilizer rates on yield of potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) in the study area. Treatments consisted of three irrigation intervals (3, 6 and 9 days), four rates of NPK (20:10:10) compound fertilizer (0, 300, 600 and 900 kg NPK ha-1) and three varieties of potato (Bertita, Diamant and Nicola). Factorial combination of irrigation interval and fertilizer rates was allocated to the main-plots while varieties were assigned to the sub-plots in a split plot design, replicated three times. The size of each sub-plot was 4.5 x 3m (13.5m). Result revealed that mean tuber diameter was highest at 3 days irrigation interval. Mean tuber weight, tuber number per stand, tuber weight per stand and fresh tuber yield were highest when irrigated at 3 or 6 days irrigation interval. Mean tuber diameter, mean tuber weight, number and weight of tubers per stand and yield per hectare peaked at 600 kg NPK ha-1, with no further significant response at fertilizer rates beyond this level. Result of irrigation and fertilizer interactions indicated that yield was generally optimized under either 3 days irrigation interval at 600 kg NPK ha-1 or 6 days irrigation interval at 900 kg NPK ha-1. From the result of this study, the use of 600 kg NPK ha-1 under 6 days irrigation scheduling proved best for high tuber yield in the study area. Also, any of the three varieties could be adopted for good yield performance.

Speaker
Biography:

K N Bhatt is a professional Researcher in Social Science with specialization in Agriculture, Environmental Economics and Social Development. He has directed and authored/co-authored 25 research projects sponsored and funded by international and national organizations in inter-disciplinary Social Science issues. He has published 7 books (plus one book is in press) and three dozen research papers. He presented research papers, delivered invited lectures, chaired session’s extensively in India and widely travelled for his academic activities in prominent universities and institutions around the world. He is reviewer for three refereed international journals. He is associate member of two reputed Canadian Institutions. He works as Professor of Economics in G B Pant Social Science Institute, Allahabad Central University, India.

Abstract:

This paper explores System of Rice Intensification or System of Root Intensification (SRI) method of cultivation for its resource use efficiency and potential for increased productivity. It analyzes the contribution of SRI in maintaining biodiversity and ecological security by ensuring decentralized agricultural communities’ control over land, water, livelihood, food and natural resources. The paper delineates policy interventions for scaling up agricultural production and types of desired institutional structures to be put in place for facilitating the method. The present technology of cultivation leaves behind ecological foot prints caused by overuse of fossil fuels and synthetic fertilizers that pollute most of world’s annual fresh water supply. Overuse of water contributes to emission of greenhouse gases causing more global warming. Such highly intensive agriculture dependent on fossil fuels, damaging to soil, fresh water, and crop diversity is becoming questionable today. The real challenge therefore is to develop/adopt strategies based on sound ecological principles and integrate traditional organic farming practices and biodiversity. SRI method is a promising resource conserving method initially perfected for rice cultivation and now its core practices are also being applied to sugarcane, wheat, ragi, mustard and vegetable production both under irrigated and rain fed conditions. The method is based on application of controlled irrigation which reverses climate change in comparison with flooding irrigation management of rice production. Around 40 countries of the world today are reaping the benefits of SRI. In India, the method is gradually spreading, improving productivity/profits, reducing water inputs and challenging high input driven post Green Revolution agricultural practices. About one million farmers are reported to have tested SRI in more than 350 rice growing districts in the country. In brief, Indian agriculture is witnessing a fine blending of scientific and indigenous knowledge systems in agro ecological crop management. These farm based approaches clearly offer a ray of hope for small, marginal, resource poor farmers and food security of the nation.

Biography:

Ali Tan Kee Zuan has completed his PhD from Universiti Putra Malaysia. Currently, he is a senior Lecturer at Department of Land Management, Faculty of Agriculture, Universiti Putra Malaysia. He is the honorable Assistant Secretary of Malaysian Soil Science Society, a non-goverment organization aims to promote the study of Soil Science. He has won several academic awards and has published papers in international journals. His main research interest is Soil Microbiology, involving manipulation of beneficial soil microbes to benefit the crops.

Abstract:

Recently, there has been much interest on the application of PGPR and rhizobia as multi-strain biofertilizer for crops to benefit from the consortium of biochemical characteristics. Several laboratory and glasshouse studies were conducted to assess the beneficial effects of locally isolated PGPR and rhizobia on Malaysian rice variety, MR219. Based on 16S rDNA gene sequencing, these bacterial strains were identified as Lysinibacillus xylanilyticus, Alcaligenes faecalis, Bradyrhizobium japonicum, Rhizobium etli and Bacillus subtilis. These isolates were selected as a potential strains in the development of multistrain biofertilizer for having multiple beneficial abilities namely biological nitrogen fixation, solubilization of phosphate and potassium, production of phytohormone, hydrolyzing enzymes and iron siderophore. Laboratory study has demonstrated the effectiveness of these strains on early growth and vigor of rice seedlings under controlled condition. A subsequent
glasshouse studies have showed a significant improvement of rice growth and yield with bacterial inoculations, particularly when supplied with minimal fertilizer-N rate (33% from the recommended rate). Single and multi-strain inoculations also significantly promoted plant and root growth, tiller numbers, plant dry weight, nutrient accumulations and produced a lower 15N enrichment than uninoculated control that received similar N-fertilizer (33% N). The lower 15N enrichment indicates the occurrence of biological N2 fixation. The proportion of N uptake from atmosphere was estimated at 22% Ndfa. The study revealed a possible new and beneficial biofertilizer formulation to promote growth and yield of rice plants at reduced chemical N-fertilizer input in a sustainable and environmental-friendly agricultural system.

Speaker
Biography:

Ranju Chapagain is a Water Professional and has recently completed her Master’s in Water Engineering and Management from Asian Institute, Thailand. Currently, she is working on Water Management.

Abstract:

Climate change and global warming pose a significant threat to agriculture and global water security. The research investigates the effects of climate change on water footprint on rice production on Nam Oon irrigation project in Sakon Nakhon province of Thailand. Three rice cultivars, KDML 105, RD6 and ChaiNat-1, were considered in this study. KDML 105 and RD6 are the wet season (June- November) rice cultivars whereas ChaiNat-1 was used in the dry season (January- May). CERES-Rice crop growth model was used to simulate rice production which was set up and validated using yield data obtained from field experiments conducted in Sakon Nakhon province by Sakon Nakhon Rice Research Center during 2009-2014 for two cultivars KDML 105 and RD6 and yield data from 2011-2014 for cultivar ChaiNat-1. Present water footprint (green, blue and grey) of rice was then calculated in the irrigation project area. Climatic variations with main focus on temperature and precipitation were considered for the research. CERES-rice model was then fed with properly downscaled climate projections (RCP 4.5 and RCP 8.5 scenarios) from three RCMs (ACCESS-1, CSIRO-CCAM, MPI-ESM-LR), included within the board of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, IPCC. Under the worst, decreased precipitation and increased temperature, decreased crop yield and water footprint, especially blue, was increased for KDML 105 and RD6. This could be due to increased evapotranspiration, higher irrigation demand and lower final yield. On contrary, crop yield increased and also water footprint decreased for ChaiNat-1 under most likely increasing temperature and decreasing precipitation. A possibly increase of precipitation in the dry season (January to May) as predicted by most RCMs, may partly cover up for the increase in temperature, especially in April and May. Thus, there is decrease in water footprint for ChaiNat-1. This research provided insights as how one can: Evaluate the water requirement for rice cultivation or any other crops; and evaluate the impact of future climate on water footprint of rice production.